Four Simple Ways to Regroup after Not Getting the Job

When the horse is dead, dismount.
— Jeb Blount

Disapointment Sets In

It’s no secret when you don’t get the job, it stinks. Many times, hours of preparation are involved, new clothing is purchased, and hours of travel have been invested. You’ve had to take a little time off to meet with the prospective employer that you could have spent on leisure.

Sacrifices have been made and including time, money and energy. Often when you don’t get the job, it seems as if it were for nothing.

There is a better way to look at it.

Everything You Need to Know about Moving On When You Don’t Get the Job You Want

1. Beware of Developing a Sour Attitude: Naturally you’ll focus on all the time you’ve ‘wasted’ on one opportunity or another. However, look at yourself as worth the time investment. It takes time to find the company that loves you back. It takes some time to become good at interviewing especially if you haven’t done it for a while. Good paying, 

 Careers don’t just happen to most of us, we must work hard to make them successful. When you don’t get the job you want, practice being grateful for getting the chance to interview.

Why be grateful? Because the better you interview the more money you will make.  If you’re getting every job you interview for you should interview for higher level or more competitive roles.

2. Keep Looking for the Perfect Fit: Keep looking until you have an offer. Finding a new employer has highs and lows and can be full of disappointment. You can get all the way to the end of an interview process and find out you were the second choice. Keep looking until you receive an offer.

3. Remember Everything Counts: Small things matter. Showing up late, forgetting to send a thank you note, executive presence, all the little things count. Easy to dash off emails, but harder to slow down and make sure everything is spelled correctly.

4. Learn from Perceptions: You don’t have to change who you are to get a great job offer. You don’t need to be someone else. It does help if you are open-minded to accepting feedback. If you can present the best version of yourself, you will improve your compensation and career opportunities.

Not all the feedback is relevant or 100% accurate, but most feedback carries some truth. Be open to what can be adopted, applied, and used to increase your chances of getting a new role.

If you haven’t gotten the offer you’re looking for, check out our software sales roles HERE. After all, until there’s an offer shouldn’t you keep the pipeline full?